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serial consign

serial consign
Serial Consign is the blog of designer and curator Greg J. Smith. The site serves as the nexus of an ongoing discussion about design, technology and culture. Content includes commentary on software and tools, reviews of exhibits and texts, the catalo
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Articles

periodic table of architecture
2008-06-10 19:43:00
Having connections to web development and architectural practice (I've developed sites for two architecture studios) I'm rather opinionated about the manner in which firms archive and market themselves online. In general, I think the presence of most architecture firms on the web is tremendously underwhelming and the organization of an online portfolio almost alway boils down to the "timeline vs. project typology" binary. That said, I was pleasantly surprised to stumble across the web site for LOHA: Lorcan O'Herlihy Architects this past weekend. The LOHA site mimics the structure and appearance of the Periodic Table of Elements and proposes a classification system for pertinent information associated with architectural practice. As illustrated in the screen capture above, the interface for the site is essentially the project archives and entries are categorized into news, project types, firm recognition and publications—all the information you'd expect a firm to provide. ...
More About: Architecture , Periodic Table
corporate anthropology
2008-06-08 18:11:00
This most recent edition of Metropolis has an interesting piece on the intersection of the practices of anthropologist and researcher Karen Stephenson and Mark Cavagnero Associates Architects. Stephenson was hired by Chronicle Books as a "organizational consultant" to assist in the spatial design of their new office. The size of the publisher's staff had doubled over the past decade, and the company had simply made do with the limitations and layout of their previous location. In planning the conversion of their new space (a four-story former ironworks), Chronicle creative director Michael Carabetta brought Stephenson on board to help schematize an idealized office workflow as the basis for a programme for Mark Cavagnero Associates to work with. Stephenson is a Harvard-educated anthropologist turned management guru who has enjoyed widespread recognition ever since being profiled in Designs for Working, a 2000 New Yorker article by Malcolm Gladwell. The diagram above illustrates the...
More About: Corporate , Anthropology
mutek 2008 mini-review
2008-06-05 07:02:00
[murcof & xx+xy visuals at a/visions 1 / image: basic_sounds] For me, the end of May is always marked by a road trip to Montreal for the Mutek festival. I haven't taken in the entire festival since 2006 as that year I realized that I have a tolerance for about ten shows in a week, after which point I start to run up a dangerous bar tab and foam at the mouth. As luck would have it, this year's schedule condensed most of the programming I was interested in into a 48 hour window. I opted to arrive in Montreal on Thursday evening and skip the Saturday night and Sunday events and more or less saw and heard what I needed to. I'm not going to provide that much of a qualitative assessment of the artists and performances I saw and heard but what follows may provide some useful observations and links for the interested. First and foremost, it is really great to see the scope and quality of the A/V programming improving and diversifying. This year's lineup featured three dedicated A/V...
More About: Review , Mini , 2008
gone fishin'
2008-05-28 04:08:00
I just realized that this month has snuck by with only a smattering of posts. For whatever reason everything I've been working on has been due over the last few weeks and my workload has been ridiculous. So it is with great pleasure that I announce that I am off to Montreal for a good chunk of the Mutek festival and a quasi-vacation. I have taken a whopping one day off in the last half year, so hopefully this trip will kickstart a more relaxed pace for the coming summer months. I'll be back in Toronto on Sunday to present the second performance of my AV collaboration (screen capture above) with Neil Wiernik for Concrete Toronto Music. So if you're a local cat, please consider venturing to the Science Centre on Sunday afternoon for what promises to be an engaging show. Alan Bloor (aka Knurl) played the most visceral set that I've heard in years at the first performance (contact mics + concrete blocks + arsenal of effects pedals). Despite the recent post drought about a hundred ne...
lifemapping
2008-05-20 03:13:00
I've been doing a little thinking about biography and self-archiving this weekend. Said train of thought was inspired by a chance encounter with the above project on ffffound! last week. This visualization is designer Ritwik Dey's Lifemap, a project he completed in an information design course at Parsons in 2005. The chart tracks Ritwik's education, topics of study (top), general interests (bottom), geographic location as well as milestones (i.e. the year he met his partner). These topics were traced back 18 years and Dey's elegant organizational scheme for these timelines lends itself to hypothesizing what activities inspired what subsequent interests (i.e. it appears calligraphy was his gateway into the world of design). If this project is of interest to you be sure to examine Ritwik's personal site as he has an interesting range of projects in his portfolio. The image above is a detail of Gregory M. Dizzia's ambitious visual relationship history, a project that I have wa...
much ado about everyblock
2008-05-13 06:54:00
Imagine film of a normal street right now, a relatively busy crossroads at 9AM taken from a vantage point high above the street, looking down at an angle as if from a CCTV camera. We can see several buildings, a dozen cars, and quite a few people, pavements dotted with street furniture. Freeze the frame, and scrub the film backwards and forwards a little, observing the physical activity on the street. But what can?t we see? We can?t see how the street is immersed in a twitching, pulsing cloud of data. This is over and above the well-established electromagnetic radiation, crackles of static, radio waves conveying radio and television broadcasts in digital and analogue forms, police voice traffic. This is a new kind of data, collective and individual, aggregated and discrete, open and closed, constantly logging impossibly detailed patterns of behaviour. The behaviour of the street. The above scenario is an excerpt from Dan Hill's provocative text, The Street as Platform, posted on ...
user labor markup language (ULML)
2008-05-06 06:28:00
The above screen capture is pulled from the explanation for Burak Arikan and Engin Erdogan's exciting new User Labor project. With this venture, Burak and Engin have developed User Labor Markup Language (ULML), an XML format for determining the value of online activity, interaction and connectivity. The project neatly dovetails with other web initiatives like Data Portability and OpenSocial but moves beyond discussions about online identity and data ownership into the realm of quantifying the value of user contributions to web services. The User Labor statement contextualizes the project in light of a Web 2.0 business model we have all become rather accustomed to: Granted, the user is already getting compensated by using the service for free in exchange with advertisement exposition. But, the value of the web service is based on the sum of service facilitation and content production, and the user appears as a stakeholder twice in the service ecology, as the consumer and the produce...
francis theberge / glitchism
2008-05-05 07:00:00
[francis theberge / trame004 (screen capture)] For the past few months I've been communicating with the energetic Francis Theberge who has been acting as an ambassador of sorts for the TIND video/art collective. I was introduced to Francis through his contribution to the last issue of Vague Terrain and I am quite indebted to Carrie Gates for tuning me in to his experimental video. TIND stands for thisisnotdesign, and the five member outfit have been active with a variety of multimedia installation and VJ-related projects over the last decade in Montreal. I've been having a lot of fun working through Francis' archives and thought it would be worthwhile to share links to a few of his projects and the work of TIND. The above video is the fifth installment of Francis' trame series of experimental shorts. Each of these works is a rapid-fire inventory of glitch effects, treatments and composites. These pieces all clock in at around 60 seconds and feel much more like thematic case s...
projects / spring 2008
2008-05-01 05:15:00
A while back I had promised to divulge some of the projects that I've been working on. Now that my infovis text is complete, I've been updating the ol' CV and preparing some applications for upcoming opportunities. I'll be discussing some of these projects more substantially in the future, but here is a snapshot of my creative practice at the moment: First and foremost, my Critical Sections project is moving towards completion. Critical Sections is a database drawing project that indexes notions of domesticity in 20th century architecture and film in Los Angeles. My goal with this work has been to conflate the mythos surrounding eight seminal Los Angeles movies (and related utopian houses) into a new composite narrative. I've been working with interactive designer Erik Loyer on this project and he has developed an extremely rich interface for it (the above screen capture doesn't begin to do it justice). Critical Sections will be published in the upcoming issue of Vectors an...
More About: Projects , Spring , 2008
a machine for broadcasting
2008-04-25 14:51:00
So apparently twitter is where I find all my inspiration now. Yesterday Burak Arikan shared a link on an interesting use of said microblogging platform that deserves mention. Andy Stanford-Clark, a "Master Inventor" for IBM has wired his home automation system to post updates to twitter. Earlier this year the net was abuzz with news of pothos the plant that posted to twitter when it was thirsty for water (see the MAKE post on that project) and now we have an example of an object/entity broadcasting information about a variety of states. As illustrated by the screen capture above, Andy's house posts data about water and power usage, telecommunications and temperature updates and also issues status reports pertaining to lighting and security systems. The architectural implications of this type of ambient intelligence aggregation are quite clear but what really interests me is the idea of objects using the same networks as people to communicate. I wonder if Andy's house ever asks And...
More About: Machine , Broadcasting
martin john callanan / text trends
2008-04-23 08:01:00
I've been keeping tabs on the London-based artist Martin John Callanan for quite a while now. Martin is an interdisciplinary artist whose work spans numerous mediums and engages both emerging and commonplace technology. Martin shines in the delivery and tone of his projects, his work is always decidedly deadpan and served with a dash of ennui. Some of his more well known pieces include the ambient audio installation Sonification of You, and the meta-news aggregator I Wanted to See All the News From Today (which I wrote about in my Front Page Aesthetics post last fall). Martin has just launched a new project called Text Trends , a piece commissioned by the Gallery for Internet and Media Art (GIMA), an organization that is currently setting up shop in Berlin. Text Trends is a sendup of the ubiquitous line graphs and related information returned by services like Google Trends. The project takes the content generated by these types of X vs. Y search queries and reduces this process to ...
74 nights
2008-04-21 07:12:00
On contextualizing the several years I've spent on the west coast, I've often remarked that while you can take somebody out of Los Angeles, you can't get the Los Angeles out of them. More than any other city I've spent time in, Los Angeles gets under your skin and alters your perception. I spent two years studying architecture in Culver City at the beginning of the decade and a variety of internships, research projects and a fellowship at USC have pulled me back to the city time and time again. I used to joke about L.A. being the cultural black hole at the centre of the universe, and while I can't speak for everybody I can certainly attest to the mysterious force the city exerts on me. To define my relationship with the city in terms of love and hate is far too simple. Binaries are altogether inadequate for describing a city clouded by ambiguity and characterized by veneer. I've recently been challenged to come up with my own personal "Los Angeles aesthetics" and in thinking a...
More About: Nights
kiesler at the drawing center
2008-04-16 07:35:00
[frederick kiesler / study for an exhibition / 1947] Exhibition design is a challenging arena in which to practice architecture. While the jury may still be out about the utility of the museum as spectacle, it is universally acknowledged to be in poor taste to overshadow the work being exhibited in smaller, thematic settings. The planning of "display space" put architects in the doubly dubious situation of acclimatizing themselves to the programme of the curator and the spirit of the work being exhibited. All of that said, nARCHITECTS has just completed what looks to be a promising exhibition on the drawings of Frederick Kiesler that opens this week at the Drawing Center in New York City. Frederick Kiesler (1890-1965) was an important industrial designer and architect who dedicated much of his career exploring the notion of "flow" in space. This lifelong research project culminated in Kiesler's proposal for the Endless House, a band of bulbous volumes which serve as an organic coun...
superspace at fitc
2008-04-14 03:25:00
Last week I mentioned that I would be DJing at the launch event for FITC Toronto on Saturday April the 19th. FITC is a roving interactive and new media conference that hosts events in cities like Los Angeles, Chicago, Amsterdam, Winnipeg and Toronto, which serves as home base for the festival. FITC has been around for almost a decade and routinely features engaging rosters of speakers that include designers like Joshua Davis, Zachary Lieberman and Mario Klingemann discussing their work in Flash, Processing and in an increasingly broad range of platforms. Over the last few years as the idea of the "integrated audio visual performance" has propagated, more involved installation and performance type events have been featured in the FITC program. This year, DJ and production designer extraordinaire Tom Kuo will be using the launch event to premiere Superspace, an AV collaboration with VJ Markus Heckmann. [see previous post which mentions Markus's Wüstenarchitekten project]. The goal o...
tobias c. van veen interview
2008-04-11 04:05:00
Last fall I posted about espaceSONO, a sound art show at the SAT in Montreal curated by Tobias c. van Veen. Tobias is an old friend who is active as a musician and DJ, curator and critic and in his spare time he plugs away on his Ph.D in communication & philosophy at McGill. I have wanted to interview Tobias about his creative practice for a while, but we have held off having this dialog for several months so we could specifically address his new turbulence-commissioned project, 'til death do us a part. Tobias will be performing this piece and participating in the Programmable Media II symposium in New York City tomorrow at Pace University. [tobias in the mix at noplacard feb. 2008 / photo: cato p.] Your recently launched turbulence piece 'til death do us a part is decidely lo-tech. Not only is underlying reel-to-reel technology slightly archaic but even your references are coated with a fine layer of dust. Listening through the piece, it feels very much like an autopsy for "...
More About: Interview
welcome to annexia
2008-04-07 19:29:00
The above diagram was generated by my friendfeed account which tracks and aggregates a good chunk of my online activities. If you haven't heard friendfeed is the lifestreaming platform du jour and it is probably a service that is worth keeping an eye on as it seems to have picked up where jaiku left off. The point of this post is not to split hairs regarding the microblogging turf war, rather to gesture towards the very slender section of the above pie chart that is dedicated to "other." That is Serial Consign, which the above image proves I have thoroughly neglected while I've been busy building permalinks elsewhere through my twitter, del.icio.us and tumblr activity. Unfortunately I can't qualify the rest of my non-digital life through friendfeed yet, so that pie chart is not entirely accurate as to where I've been spending the majority of my time. Truth be told, I've been prolonging the death rattle of a semi-involved writing project over the last few weeks. That crunch has ...
notes on operational narrative
2008-04-03 07:28:00
The recent Infinity Ward title Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare (COD4) has been a runaway success. Released last fall, the game has captivated both PC and console gamers with a compelling simulation of asymmetrical urban warfare. The plot of this first-person shooter hinges on a power play by a faction of Russian ultranationalists who seize control of a cache of nuclear weapons and initiate a coup in a conspicuously unidentified Middle Eastern country. The narrative of the game bounces back and forth between the perspective of members of the British SAS and the USMC 1st Force Recon and gameplay consists of a series of missions which work towards containing this escalating geopolitical crisis. COD4 contains some utterly incredible level design and the settings for the various maps include a mix of dense Middle Eastern cityscapes, small towns in the former Soviet Republic, and notably, the "dead city" of Prypiat which was abandoned after the Chernobyl disaster (the design of this level ...
More About: Notes
the invention of destruction
2008-03-27 13:47:00
[grégory chatonsky / dislocation III - 003 / 2007] Although I've been aware of his work for a while, I had never had really combed through Grégory Chatonsky's portfolio until yesterday. Networked Performance tipped me off about an upcoming NYC solo show by this multimedia artist that seems rather intriguing. The Invention of Destruction will take place at Galerie Poller this spring/summer (May 8th through July 5th) and is dedicated to exploring "the increasing aesthetization of destruction." Grégory Chatonsky was born and educated in France and has up until recently been splitting his time between Paris and Montreal. His body of work is quite varied, but he seems rather dedicated to producing stark, provocative imagery across a variety of mediums (including sculpture, photo collage and web based work), he is also a founding member of the net.art collective incident.net. The image above is from the third iteration of his Dislocation Series, which features an en...
for immediate (prss) release
2008-03-23 05:48:00
[régine debatty's recent interview with w. james au in prss release #02] Between the multitude of feeds that course through the blogosphere and variety of social bookmarking platforms there is currently no shortage of methods to curate information on the web. That said, online writing and reblogging can be a tad exclusive at times (i.e. writing and software tools "by bloggers for bloggers"). I just caught wind of an interesting project with a distinct take on the idea of aggregation that is worth mentioning. prss release is a new venture that is aptly described as an "independent paper blog aggregator". The project is a weekly PDF publication that curates ten posts from a variety of design related blogs into a compendium print-ready text. The prss release mission statement reads as follows: Information is confined to domains. Although different mediums merge more and more, still the concept of ???cross-media??? is an ideal which is rarely realized, and if attempted often un...
More About: Release
for immediate (prss) release
2008-03-23 05:48:00
[régine debatty's recent interview with w. james au in prss release #02] Between the multitude of feeds that course through the blogosphere and variety of social bookmarking platforms there is currently no shortage of methods to curate information on the web. That said, online writing and reblogging can be a tad exclusive at times (i.e. writing and software tools "by bloggers for bloggers"). I just caught wind of an interesting project with a distinct take on the idea of aggregation that is worth mentioning. prss release is a new venture that is aptly described as an "independent paper blog aggregator". The project is a weekly PDF publication that curates ten posts from a variety of design related blogs into a compendium print-ready text. The prss release mission statement reads as follows: Information is confined to domains. Although different mediums merge more and more, still the concept of ?cross-media? is an ideal which is rarely realized, and if attempted often unsucc...
More About: Release
audiobulb records
2008-03-18 04:06:00
This weekend a communique announcing a new release on Audiobulb Records ended up in the Serial Consign inbox. The project, entitled My Favourite Places, is a compilation of "audio portraits" of specific locations from around the world as collected and interpreted by several artists including Leafcutter John, Taylor Deupree and Biosphere. Each of the contributing artists have captured field recordings from a place of their choosing and composed a piece of music around their site-specific aural fragments. This in and of itself isn't revolutionary as there is no shortage of field recording-based projects, but the overall design vision for the compilation is quite noteworthy. My Favourite Places is supplemented with an interactive microsite (pictured above) which allow you to geo-locate the place that inspired each piece of music, hear the source field recordings and read brief statements from each of the artists. This flash based site is quite tasteful (i.e. no gratuitous animation) a...
audiobulb records
2008-03-18 04:06:00
This weekend a communique announcing a new release on Audiobulb Records ended up in the Serial Consign inbox. The project, entitled My Favourite Places, is a compilation of "audio portraits" of specific locations from around the world as collected and interpreted by several artists including Leafcutter John, Taylor Deupree and Biosphere. Each of the contributing artists have captured field recordings from a place of their choosing and composed a piece of music around their site-specific aural fragments. This in and of itself isn't revolutionary as there is no shortage of field recording-based projects, but the overall design vision for the compilation is quite noteworthy. My Favourite Places is supplemented with an interactive microsite (pictured above) which allow you to geo-locate the place that inspired each piece of music, hear the source field recordings and read brief statements from each of the artists. This flash based site is quite tasteful (i.e. no gratuitous animation) a...
in lieu of content - some choice links
2008-03-15 03:47:00
[lisa jevbratt / rösten (the voice) / 2006] I feel like a bad host. I've been completely absorbed with two writing projects over the last few weeks and I've most certainly neglected my posting duties. So, in lieu of an actual post please note the following stellar content: The most recent issue of Fibreculture includes an excellent text by Mitchell Whitelaw entitled Art Against Information: Case Studies in Data Practice. This essay does a great job at clarifying the distinction between data and information and then schematizes a number of types of "data practice" through close readings of several digital artists including Alex Dragulescu, Golan Levin and Lisa Jevbratt. I've noticed that the net has been buzzing with excitement about the recent WIRED feature on Data Art - Whitelaw is one of the theorists you need to read if you are interested in moving beyond frontis images. Also see his datasthetics blog (the teeming void). Lebbeus Woods has been a great addition to the blog...
More About: Links , Content , Choice
in lieu of content - some choice links
2008-03-15 03:47:00
[lisa jevbratt / rösten (the voice) / 2006] I feel like a bad host. I've been completely absorbed with two writing projects over the last few weeks and I've most certainly neglected my posting duties. So, in lieu of an actual post please note the following stellar content: The most recent issue of Fibreculture includes an excellent text by Mitchell Whitelaw entitled Art Against Information: Case Studies in Data Practice. This essay does a great job at clarifying the distinction between data and information and then schematizes a number of types of "data practice" through close readings of several digital artists including Alex Dragulescu, Golan Levin and Lisa Jevbratt. I've noticed that the net has been buzzing with excitement about the recent WIRED feature on Data Art - Whitelaw is one of the theorists you need to read if you are interested in moving beyond frontis images. Also see his datasthetics blog (the teeming void). Lebbeus Woods has been a great addition to the blog...
More About: Links , Content , Choice
david mccallum interview
2008-03-08 21:14:00
I often describe people I write about here at Serial Consign as friends and peers and both of these terms definitely apply to David McCallum. David is a Toronto-based artist and musician whose subverts electronic hardware, software and networks towards playful and performative ends. He has a background in physics and music and received a Masters in Art and Technology from Chalmers University of Technology in Göteborg, Sweden. I met David in 2006 at Mutek, and got to know him and his work through his excellent curation of our Vague Terrain issue on locative media. David's creative practice is quite varied, and perusal of his recent work reveals interests in improv performance, modified timepieces and insect orchestras. A shorter version of this interview was previously published on View on Canadian Art. Your Warbike project (pictured above) takes the commonplace activity of cycling through the city and monitors telecommunications signals to transform the modified-bicycle into...
More About: Interview
david mccallum interview
2008-03-08 21:14:00
I often describe people I write about here at Serial Consign as friends and peers and both of these terms definitely apply to David McCallum. David is a Toronto-based artist and musician whose subverts electronic hardware, software and networks towards playful and performative ends. He has a background in physics and music and received a Masters in Art and Technology from Chalmers University of Technology in Göteborg, Sweden. I met David in 2006 at Mutek, and got to know him and his work through his excellent curation of our Vague Terrain issue on locative media. David's creative practice is quite varied, and perusal of his recent work reveals interests in improv performance, modified timepieces and insect orchestras. A shorter version of this interview was previously published on View on Canadian Art. Your Warbike project (pictured above) takes the commonplace activity of cycling through the city and monitors telecommunications signals to transform the modified-bicycle into...
More About: Interview
free running in the digital city
2008-03-04 03:58:00
I just caught wind of an forthcoming game with a new take on the "open city" concept that has been explored in several titles over the last few years. Mirror's Edge is an Xbox 360 game that is currently under development by DICE in Stockholm. The narrative revolves around Faith, a nimble traceur in a predictably totalitarian, ultra-sterile futuristic cityscape. Faith, a parkour courier, has been charged with delivering some extremely valuable information - so valuable in fact that she finds herself relentlessly pursued through the city by ruthless government agents. Sweep aside all the plot junk and you are left with the potential for an exciting new simulation of the city as an elaborate playground. What immediately caught my attention about these preliminary screenshots is manner in which architecture elements are demarcated. As per her training in "the art of displacement" Faith possess an innate ability for reading the geometry of her surroundings and this translates into a pla...
More About: Running , Free , City , Free Running , Digital
free running in the digital city
2008-03-04 03:58:00
I just caught wind of an forthcoming game with a new take on the "open city" concept that has been explored in several titles over the last few years. Mirror's Edge is an Xbox 360 game that is currently under development by DICE in Stockholm. The narrative revolves around Faith, a nimble traceur in a predictably totalitarian, ultra-sterile futuristic cityscape. Faith, a parkour courier, has been charged with delivering some extremely valuable information - so valuable in fact that she finds herself relentlessly pursued through the city by ruthless government agents. Sweep aside all the plot junk and you are left with the potential for an exciting new simulation of the city as an elaborate playground. What immediately caught my attention about these preliminary screenshots is manner in which architectural elements are demarcated. As per her training in "the art of displacement" Faith possess an innate ability for reading the geometry of her surroundings and this translates into a pl...
More About: Running , Free , City , Free Running , Digital
vague terrain 09: rise of the vj
2008-03-03 03:11:00
[jackson 2bears / performance of iron tomahawks / 2007-2008] Vague Terrain is thrilled to announce the launch of our most recent issue, Vague Terrain 09: Rise of the VJ. This issue is guest curated by Saskatoon-based VJ/artist Carrie Gates and consolidates a diverse selection of video and theory. An excerpt from Carrie's statement encapsulates her excitement about the possibilities offered by performative video: The diversity of the concepts, techniques, and aesthetic qualities is remarkable, suggesting that this practice is not rooted in any one particular mindset, but instead, emerges from a wide range of trajectories that are converging within a contemporary form of media based performance art. However, live video mixing performances certainly address a hunger for immersive and synaesthetic sensory experiences where aural and visual elements work together to create a whole that is something beyond the sum of the parts. To experience the live performance of a talented VJ (or live...
vague terrain 09: rise of the vj
2008-03-03 03:11:00
[jackson 2bears / performance of iron tomahawks / 2007-2008] Vague Terrain is thrilled to announce the launch of our most recent issue, Vague Terrain 09: Rise of the VJ. This issue is guest curated by Saskatoon-based VJ/artist Carrie Gates and consolidates a diverse selection of video and theory. An excerpt from Carrie's statement encapsulates her excitement about the possibilities offered by performative video: The diversity of the concepts, techniques, and aesthetic qualities is remarkable, suggesting that this practice is not rooted in any one particular mindset, but instead, emerges from a wide range of trajectories that are converging within a contemporary form of media based performance art. However, live video mixing performances certainly address a hunger for immersive and synaesthetic sensory experiences where aural and visual elements work together to create a whole that is something beyond the sum of the parts. To experience the live performance of a talented VJ (or live...
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