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News For Natives, Native American Indian stories,


News For Natives, Native American Indian stories,
News For Natives, Native American Indian stories, people, history, events, political satire, history, etc.

Articles

HUMOR The Bronze Rat
2008-04-18 01:25:00
A Sioux Indian was traveling through San Francisco one day when he ended up in a strange little curio store deep in the heart of China Town. While looking around in amazement at all the wonderful things the old Chinese man had to offer, his gaze fell on a small, bronze, rat. “How much do you ...
More About: Humor , Bronze
HUMOR: Cold Minnesota Winters
2008-04-17 22:31:00
Some Minnesota Sioux asked their Chief one Autumn if the winter was going to be a very cold one or a very mild one. Not really knowing the answer but wanting to be prepared, the chief replies that the winter was going to be cold and that the members of the village were to collect ...
More About: Humor , Cold , Winters
Shakopee grant helps Kiowa Tribe purchase Indian City USA
2008-04-09 20:24:00
by: Brian Daffron / Today correspondent Grand re-opening to take place May 17-18 2008 ANADARKO, Okla. - Indian City USA has been a tourist draw since 1955, when it was built south of Anadarko with the help of University of Oklahoma anthropologists.   Photos by Brian Daffron — Indian City USA has been a tourist draw since ...
More About: Grant , Tribe , Purchase
For some Indian tribes, casinos are a bad bargain
2008-04-07 05:36:00
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, Ariz. (AP) - To leaders of the Hualapai Indian Tribe, opening a casino on the south rim of the Grand Canyon (PHOTOS)seemed like a great idea at the time. They dreamed of tourists flocking to play a few rounds on a one-armed bandit before stepping outside for a spectacular, unspoiled view of America’s most famous natural wonder. But in the rush to bring badly needed jobs and revenue to the reservation, tribal officials overlooked some serious stumbling blocks - like the fact that the road in from the nearest highway is a 14-mile unpaved nightmare of fist-sized rocks, blind turns and tire-eating ruts. “We thought it would be successful, but we didn’t last seven months,” says Hualapai vice-chairman Edgar Walema, sitting in the building that used to be the tribe’s casino before it closed in 1995. The building is now the terminal for a small airstrip where tourists fly in to see the canyon. “Most of the tourists come h...
More About: Bargain , Casinos
BIA Official Memo To Prospective Indians
2008-04-07 03:29:00
U.S. Department of the Interior On The Web Bureau of Indian Affairs on Indian Ancestry and prospective applicants. Thousands of people throughout the United States have some degree of Indian blood. However, unless such an individual has at least one parent legally entitled to membership in a federally recognized Indian tribe, it is improbable that he/she can qualify for special federal services available to Indians or share in assets owned by an Indian tribe. The burden of proof of Indian ancestry rests with the individual claiming possession of Indian blood. Many people are descended from eastern tribes that disbanded before the present Government of the United States came into being in 1789. As a result, there are no existing Indian groups with which these individuals can affiliate. Other, descended from western tribes, but cannot substantiate their claim to membership in an Indian tribe due to lack of early family records. Contrary to popular belief, Indians do not receive p...
More About: Memo , Official , Prospective
Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community recognized for environmental efforts
2008-04-05 20:07:00
Prior Lake, Minnesota- The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development has named the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community (SMSC) one of 30 semi-finalists from across the country for its prestigious Honoring Nations Award. The SMSC was initially nominated for the award and then later submitted an application in the field of “Conservation Stewards” for its efforts to protect and preserve the environment. “We are pleased to have been nominated for our efforts to take care of the environment. It is important to protect it for future generations so that they might flourish,” said SMSC Chairman Stanley R. Crooks. “Our Community members have made this a priority.” This year 110 applications from 69 Indian nations and 10 inter-tribal collaborations were received. “The quality of the applicant pool was extremely impressive, and after evaluating each of the applications on the criteria of effectiveness, significance, cultural relevance, t...
More About: Environmental
Jim Anderson (Red Sky) "Protecting The Past" (GENECIDE POEM)
2008-03-29 20:47:00
Wonderful video of Jim Anderson discussing the desecration of sacred Native Sites including burial mounds. ending with a lone sad flute playing while he reads his poem entitled "Genocide" YouTube - Protecting the Past       COMMENTS: NICOLEJETTE Strong & loyal words. Beautiful heart. Beautiful people. Thank you for posting this so we all may be enlightened on these issues. Much love. Many blessings~ Nicole Jetté smallexpressions A great talk and lesson for us all to protect our cultures. def got my 5* vote! OkanoganLdy Thank You ladychoctaw for sharing this video, it should be a crime for them to dig up our sacred grounds where our people are buried… We all know what would happen if we did this in THEIR burial grounds of today? japanime99 i agree with walkingbear56 there arnt some thing that are not for sale!!!! Native pride all the way. stop destroying the sacred sites! masterccha...
More About: Poem
Native Americans and Illegal Immigration
2008-03-29 01:54:00
What happens when you don’t control immigration?  CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE Just ask the Indians!
More About: Illegal Immigration , Immigration , Native Americans , Americans , Illegal
Impromptu Native American Blues (VIDEO)
2008-03-24 16:26:00
"REZ BLUES 2006" Recorded live at Ringside Cafe, in St. Pete, Florida. 2006. Sylvia A. Duquet, Video grapher/Tam bourine…..Chaska Denny, Slide Guitar…Curt H. St. Cyr, Harmonica Alvon Griffin, Percussionist…This was unrehearsed and impromptu, with words and music made up on the spot
More About: Blues , Native American , American , Native
Zeezibahkwat - Maple Sugar Bush (Syrup)
2008-03-24 06:03:00
History of Maple Sugar and Maple Syrup   The first people to make maple sugar were the Native American tribes of the Northeast, who used it as a flavoring for breads, stews, teas, and vegetables. Native Americans also traded maple sugar for other products they needed. The French and English colonists were delighted with the taste of maple sugar, and eventually they learned the process of making it from the Native Americans. Maple sugar became the principal sweetener in North America. (Native Americans and colonists could not store maple syrup easily, so they used the dry form.) When cane sugar was introduced, New Englanders still preferred maple sugar because it was much cheaper and did not involve West Indian slave labor. Once a staple of American life, the sweet products of the maple tree are now specialty items. Over the years, the price of cane sugar fell dramatically, and now cane sugar is the variety most Americans use every day. The popularity of maple syru...
More About: Bush
All about the Upper Sioux Tribe
2008-03-22 16:23:00
The Reservation tribal headquarters is located five miles south of Granite Falls, Minnesota, on the Minnesota River in Yellow Medicine County. The reservation is 115 miles west of Minneapolis. History This land we call Pejuhutazizi Kapi (The place where they dig for yellow medicine) has been the homeland for our people, the Dakota Oyate (Nation), for thousands of years. We have always occupied this area bordering the Minnesota River Valley, with the exception of a short period of time in the late 1800’s following the US/Dakota Conflict of 1862. At that time they were either exterminated, forcibly moved to reservation elsewhere, or fled to avoid harm. Many Dakota died during that difficult time. Some of those who survived the forced removal defied the State and Federal Governments be not remaining on the assigned reservations located outside of Minnesota, but rather chose to return to our ancient homelands in the Minnesota River Valley. In 1938, 746 acres of original Dakota l...
More About: Tribe , Sioux
All about the Shakopee Tribe
2008-03-22 16:13:00
Before European Contact   The Minnesota River Valley has been home to the Dakota for hundreds of years, and the existence of our ancestors was sustained by their relationship with the earth and their surroundings. For generations, Dakota families fished from the river, gathered rice from area lakes, and hunted game on the prairies and in the river valley woodlands. Along the banks of the lower Minnesota River, leaders of the Eastern Dakota including Sakpe, Mazomani, Chaske, and Wambdi Tanka, established villages. From these home sites, the Eastern Dakota traveled for hunting, gathering, and meeting with other bands of Dakota. The Treaty and Reservation Era Beginning in 1805, a series of treaties forced on the Dakota nation over the next 50 years would see their lands taken away, their ability to provide for themselves destroyed, and an increasing reliance upon the government’s promises for payments and goods. The traditional Dakota way of life was largely replaced by...
More About: Tribe
Mystic Lake Casino in Mall of America
2008-03-10 19:27:00
Mystic Lake Casino in Mall of America If you live in the Twin Cities, you can check out one of our recently completed O&E projects in person at the Mall of America. The O&E team worked with the project management team at Design Build Solutions to remodel the 1200 square foot Mystic Lake Casino retail space for the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community. The objectives were to update the Mystic Lake store and tie it to the current casino marketing campaign, “Closer to the Action,” with an emphasis on laying the foundation for a positive, fun family experience at the Mystic lake Hotel & Casino. In addition, we were asked to create a portion of the store to display exhibits about tribal culture and history. The current layout of the store was inherited from the previous owner and the environment was never reformatted to suit the Client. Our design goal was to reformat the store to suit the customers’ needs while enhancing the employees’ ability to provide service. Of...
Navajo Proverb
2008-03-10 18:36:00
I have been to the end of the earth. I have been to the end of the waters. I have been to the end of the sky. I have been to the end of the mountains. I have found none that are not my friends. —Navajo proverb
Native American programs in Genesee County search for students amidst compl
2008-02-22 06:54:00
by RoNeisha Mullen | The Flint Journal Thursday February 21, 2008, 4:21 PM FLINT TWP. — Local Native American education programs are seeing declining numbers, a sad statement on families rejecting their heritage, some educators say. "For so long, Native Americans had been taught to deny their culture because they’d be tormented," said Jean Keen, a Native American specialist with the Carman-Ainsworth/Westwood Heights program. "Now, we’re having a hard time getting them to embrace it. They don’t understand the point. Schools spend a lot of time chasing families they know are eligible." Such local programs are trying to find more students but that can be difficult in the face of the cultural apathy, not to mention declining Native American numbers. "A lot of our students don’t know that they are of Native American heritage," said Sue Diebel, a Carman-Ainsworth teacher who’s part of an advisory group over the program....
More About: Programs , Students , Search
Cultural Council funds Native American program
2008-02-22 06:51:00
Rochester - The Rochester Cultural Council has awarded $589 in funding to support the Native American Educational Outreach Project at the Robbins Museum of Archaeology, located at 17 Jackson St. in Middleborough. Funding from the Rochester Cultural Council will cover the costs of transportation to and admission at the museum for local third-grade students and their teachers who wish to visit the Robbins Museum. Exhibits at the museum cover over 10,000 years of Native American history and culture, and, according to Robbins Museum education liaison Mary Concannon, contextualize instruction on Massachusetts history, providing insight into and understanding of the dynamic role Native Americans have played in shaping our Commonwealth. “The Robbins is the only museum dedicated to Native American history in Massachusetts,” Concannon said. “A key goal of our programming is to make our exhibits and educational materials relevant to students and easy-to-use by educators. So, if teac...
More About: Program , Funds
House to vote on proposed Native American Affairs Committee
2008-02-22 06:45:00
By Travis Coleman Journal staff writer SIOUX CITY — The proposed creation of a Commission on Native American Affairs is up for a vote in the Iowa House of Representatives after being unanimously approved by the House State Government Committee this week. The commission aims to work with tribal governments, groups and members in the areas of human rights, access to justice, economic equality and the elimination of discrimination. Gov. Chet Culver will appoint an 11-person committee with four people representing the land-holding tribes in Iowa: Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa, Omaha Tribe of Nebraska, Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska and Ponca Tribe of Nebraska. Of seven other appointed members, at least one must be a tribal member living on a tribal settlement or reservation in Iowa. Five members will serve two-year terms and six will serve four-year terms. "There are over 115,000 Native Americans in Iowa, and they deserve the same respect and protections that oth...
More About: Vote
TSTC Powwow to highlight Native American culture
2008-02-22 06:44:00
Texas State Technical College WacoReporter: Mary DrennonEmail Address: mary.drennon@tstc.edu WACO) - Colorful costumes, social Native American dance and song and much more will be on tap this spring at Texas State Technical College Waco. The Native American Student Association of TSTC will host the 2008 Waco Intertribal Powwow from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Saturday, March 8, in the gym of the Murray Watson Jr. Recreation Center on Campus Drive. The event is sponsored by the Four Winds Intertribal Society Inc. The event is free and the public is invited to attend. Highlight s of the event include a traditional Gourd Dance with Head Gourd Dancer Bobby Cazares at noon and again at 5 p.m. Grand Entry will be 1 p.m. and again at 6 p.m. Ray Duncan will serve as Master of Ceremony, with Phil Stucker as Head Man and Rita Deer Sky as Head Lady. Drum group is Lodge Pole Singers and Arena Director is Steve Zavala. There are no drugs, alcohol, firearms or pets allowed at the event. Spectators are...
More About: Culture , American Culture
House to vote on proposed Native American Affairs Committee
2008-02-22 06:36:00
By Travis Coleman Journal staff writer SIOUX CITY — The proposed creation of a Commission on Native American Affairs is up for a vote in the Iowa House of Representatives after being unanimously approved by the House State Government Committee this week. The commission aims to work with tribal governments, groups and members in the areas of human rights, access to justice, economic equality and the elimination of discrimination. Gov. Chet Culver will appoint an 11-person committee with four people representing the land-holding tribes in Iowa: Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa, Omaha Tribe of Nebraska, Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska and Ponca Tribe of Nebraska. Of seven other appointed members, at least one must be a tribal member living on a tribal settlement or reservation in Iowa. Five members will serve two-year terms and six will serve four-year terms. "There are over 115,000 Native Americans in Iowa, and they deserve the same respect and protections that othe...
More About: Vote
The return of Turok, a Native American comic-book hero
2008-02-22 06:26:00
By Blaine Kyllo Propaganda Games was formed three years ago by a group of former Electronic Arts staffers. Within months, it was acquired by Buena Vista Games, now Disney Interactive Studios. In an interview with the Georgia Straight at Propaganda’s Vancouver offices, general manager and vice president Josh Holmes said the company had been working on an original concept for a third-person action game, but scrapped it when it won the right to develop the new Turok video game for Touchstone, a Disney brand. The first Turok game—1997’s Turok: Dinosaur Hunter for the Nintendo 64—was one of the earliest first-person shooters produced for console gaming systems. Turok first appeared in a 1954 comic book in a story by Gaylord DuBois, who was known for writing outdoor-adventure comics about such characters as Tarzan, Roy Rogers, and Sergeant Preston of the Yukon. Turok changed over the years, depending on who was using him and for what purpose, but one thing has remained ...
More About: Comic , Native American , Book , American , Return
Last of Lakota Sioux Code Talkers Recalls WWII Service
2008-02-22 06:06:00
By Greg Flakus, VoA News They have been called the Greatest Generation for what they did to stop the Nazis in Europe and the Imperialist Japanese army in Asia and the Pacific. Veterans of World War II are said to be dying at the rate of 1,000 a day. Among those still with us are a few members of Native American Indian tribes, whose unique languages played a crucial role in the war effort. VOA correspondent Greg Flakus sought out one of them in Pine Ridge, South Dakota recently and filed this report about the last of the Lakota Code Talkers Navajo Code Talkers September 27, 2007 - Pine Ridge, South Dakota - The language is Lakota, one of three dialects of the people collectively called Sioux , a tribe of hunters and warriors that once roamed all over the northern plains. The language is divided into three dialects - Dakota, Nakota and Lakota - but any person who speaks one dialect can understand the others. Clarence Wolf Guts is an 83-year-old Lakota warrior whose...
More About: Service
Schooling, Immersion Programs Help Save Endangered Languages
2008-02-20 19:40:00
__________________________  Science Conference Addresses Importance of Preservation By Art Chimes, VoA News  San Francisco, CA - February 28, 2007 - There are nearly 7,000 languages on Earth, but experts say about half of them are endangered, meaning only a small and declining number of often elderly people speak the language. Major world and national languages crowd out indigenous ones, and it’s estimated that more languages became extinct in the 20th century than at any other time in history. For scientists, the loss of a language represents a very real loss of knowledge. And that knowledge could save lives at a time when drug companies search tropical forests for biologically-based medical breakthroughs, and many if not most plant and animal species remain unknown to Western science. Professor David Harrison of Swarthmore College decries the loss of scientific knowledge when languages die  At last week’s meeting of the American Association for the Advancemen...
More About: Programs , Languages , Save , Endangered , Immersion
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